Áfram í innihald
Athugið, netverslunin er enn í vinnslu og á eftir að setja inn mikið af vörum og snyrta allt til. Erum á fullu að vinna í þessu og náum þessu innan skamms.
Athugið, netverslunin er enn í vinnslu og á eftir að setja inn mikið af vörum.

Orð sem byrja á - M - (enska)

Machine Needles

A needle made specifically for a sewing machine. Unlike a hand sewing needle, a machine needle's eye is towards the tip. There are many different types of machine needles which include denim, leather, serger, quilting and stretch. Each has a unique point that meets the needs of the fabric or project. There are two measurements associated with machine needles. The American measurement was created by Singer, while the European measurement originated in 1942 going by the acronym NM or number metric. The Number Metric measures the needle to a hundredth of a millimeter. The larger the number in both types of measurement, the thicker the needle is.

Machine Oil

Machines of all kinds need their parts to be oiled in order to move smoothly. Sewing machine oil provides the gears with a protective layer as it is a light, transparent synthetic lubricant. It keeps the sewing machine from the wear-and-tear of use.

Mackinaw Cloth

A twill or double cloth with a concealed weave comprised of an ordinary grade of wool, and often seen with re-used or re-manufactured wool mixed in. Mackinaw cloth is very heavily fulled or felted and napped on both sides to conceal the weave and sometimes has a cotton warp. Popularized in Canada, the cloth was used to create a short double shoulder jacket by the same name. The woolen fabric is heavy and dense making it useful for outerwear applications. Although it dates back to the early 1800's, the cloth throughout the years has been sought after by the working class for its durable and water-repellent nature. It is typically seen with a plaid print and is widely associated with loggers, skaters and the hipster subculture.

Uses:

  • coats
  • jackets
  • overshirts

Pros:

  • durable
  • warm
  • water-repellent
  • heavy

Macrame

A series of knots that create a whole piece of fabric. Dating back to the 13th century, the word macrame stems from the Arabic word migramah which means "fringe". Cords or yarns of various fibers such as cotton or linen are knotted to create a desired pattern or image. There are many different types of knots, but the most popular is the square knot. Macrame is used in apparel, wall hangings, jewelry and home decor.

Uses:

  • apparel
  • wall hangs
  • jewelry
  • home decor

Madras

Named after the region it was from (Madras, India), the lightweight cotton woven, typically occupied by a plaid design, was exported to the Middle East and Africa, and used to make head wraps. Originally, the fabric was made of short-staple yarns which were then yarn dyed. Since the yarns were so fragile, they could not be combed creating a textured hand. Often the dyes are not fast and with each washing, color changes take place.

Uses:

  • shirting
  • shorts
  • pajamas
  • blazers
  • pants

Pros:

  • breathable
  • tactile
  • drapable

Cons:

  • poor color fastness

Madras Plaid

It wasn't until the 17th century that the plaid pattern Madras is synonymous for covered the woven. The brightly colored plaid was mostly worn by the working class in India where it originated, and therefore was not popular. After the governor of Madras donated the fabric to Yale, the pattern was given a affluent and preppy reputation. Today, the pattern is featured on cotton wovens, seersuckers and as a patchwork design. A madras plaid differs from a Tartan Plaid in that a tartan must be symmetrical and evenly spaced, where as the plaid pattern of a Madras could be random and irregular.

Manila Hemp

A natural vegetable fiber derived from the Musa textilis plant in the Philippines whose plant stems from the banana family. Also known as Abaca, it is a hard fiber. Mature plants are processed much the same as flax and hemp. The finer fibers, often 5 m (15 ft) long, are used for weaving cloth. The outer, coarser fibers are used in the manufacture of matting and durable cordage; the latter is widely considered the finest rope made. Manila hemp is very strong with great luster.

Uses:

  • hammocks
  • ropes
  • canvas
  • hats
  • bags

Pros:

  • strong
  • durable
  • flexible
  • lustrous
  • fine
  • resistant to salt water damage

Cons:

  • shrinks in water

Manufactured Fiber

A man-made fiber that is produced using chemical synthesis. The production of manufactured fibers began in the early 1880's. A few manufactured fibers include nylon, acrylic, polyester, rayon, spandex, modal and lycocell . (see synthetic fibers)

Uses:

  • home
  • fashion

Pros:

  • durable
  • dyes well
  • can be water-resistant and stain resistant
  • resistant to wrinkling

Cons:

  • low melting temperature
  • holds static
  • can be damaged by heat

Marabou Feathers

Comprised from the down feathers of a Marabou stork. The feathers are fluffy and soft. They can be easily dyed any color. During the 18th century, the feathers were primarily used as trims for hats, boas and muffs. Today they are associated with old Hollywood glamour after being worn by Marilyn Monroe.

Uses:

  • trims
  • muffs
  • shawls

Pros:

  • soft
  • takes dye well

Marocain

A type of crepe that is heavy weight and has thick weft yarns that gives it a cross-ribbed design. Tends to have a wavy look.

Marquisette

A thin, lightweight mesh that dates back to 1908. It may be made out of almost any fiber. Its drape has varied from soft and fluid to stiffer and organdy-like depending on what it is made out of. It has been used to create evening dresses, curtains and mosquito netting.

Uses:

  • dresses
  • curtains
  • mosquito nets

Pros:

  • sheer
  • wears and launders well

Marseille's Cloth

A fabric from the 18th century where two layers of fabric were given a design using a cord. The English used the phrase Marseille's Cloth since its origins are from Marseille, France. The French later changed its name to the French word "to quilt," Matelasse.

Uses:

  • dresses
  • bedding

Pros:

  • tactile
  • quilt-like
  • heavy

Matelasse

Made to imitate a quilt, two pieces of fabric are woven together to create a cushioned feel without the filler. They usually are patterned with a geometric or floral design. The fabric was hand woven up until the early 1740's when it started being made from a loom. In 1760, the fabric became more readily available leading to it popularity. The fabric was used for skirts, aprons, and dresses among other pieces. Although the fabric has lost popularity in fashion applications, it continues to be used for bedding and home decor.

Uses:

  • fashion applications
  • home applications
  • bedding

Pros:

  • tactile
  • quilt-like

Matte

A dull appearance that is void of shine.

Matte Jersey

A type of jersey knit that has a dry hand and a matte appearance.

Uses:

  • tees
  • tops
  • dresses
  • skirts
  • leggings

Pros:

  • dry hand
  • smooth
  • stretch
  • drapable
  • comfortable
  • thin
  • lightweight
  • wrinkled resistant

Cons:

  • curls at hems
  • susceptible to unraveling

Medallion (knit)

An intricate stitch pattern that consists of repetitive geometric shapes used to create a circular shape based off of a mathematical formula. The pattern stems from Islamic art where it has been featured in mosques.

Uses:

  • knit tops
  • bags
  • cardigans

Pros:

  • airy
  • intricate
  • delicate

Cons:

  • porous
  • curls or ruffles at edges depending on certain variables

Medallion (print)

An intricate pattern that consists of repetitive geometric shapes used to create a round shape. The pattern stems from Islamic art where it has been featured in mosques.

Uses:

  • tees
  • tops
  • dresses
  • skirts

Pros:

  • intricacy
  • comfort
  • complexity

Cons:

  • not as detailed as medallion knit pattern

Melange

A form of fiber created from either multiple different fibers, or multiple colors of the same fiber to create a unique color pattern. Often produces a heathered or speckled appearance.

Uses:

  • shirts
  • tops
  • sweaters
  • sweatshirts

Pros:

  • unique color pattern
  • versatility

Cons:

  • durability dependant on content
  • low stretch

Melton

A twill fabric with a composition of either entirely wool or a cotton warp and a wool weft, which goes through the fulling process, thus hiding its weave behind a smooth surface. The fabric is napped and very closely sheared. Looks like wool felt - pressed flat. Meltons are prized for there durability and weatherproof properties. Often used in fox hunting coats, and the underside of collars on jackets. See also beaver cloth .

Uses:

  • Coating
  • Hats

Pros:

  • soft
  • heavy
  • good thermal retention
  • lustrous
  • durable
  • weatherproof

Cons:

  • prone to shrinkage when exposed to heat or steam

Melwyn

A durable woven fabric made in a small Cornish village known for its rugged appearance.

Mercerization

A process done to cellulosic fibers with a solution of Caustic Soda (Sodium Hydroxide) to add luster and increase absorbency in the dying processes (or dye affinity). Invented by John Mercer in 1844. This process can be used on hemp fibers as well.

Uses:

  • shirtings

Pros:

  • increased luster
  • better dye affinity

Mesh

A loosely knit or woven fabric with a series of evenly spaced holes throughout. Used for a variety of purposes.

Uses:

  • athleticwear
  • tops
  • lingere
  • shapewear
  • hosiery
  • costuming

Pros:

  • breathes well
  • modest stretch
  • typically lightweight

Cons:

  • weave pattern creates a peek-a-boo effect
  • typically translucent

Messaline

A textile weave that consists of a glossy face and a matte back. Created by four or more weft threads floating over the warp threads. It is very soft, lustrous and lightweight. (see Satin )

Uses:

  • shirts
  • lingerie
  • accessories
  • formalwear

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • durable
  • versatile

Cons:

  • difficult to maneuver while sewing

Metal Button

A closure made from metal (usually accompanied by a hole) that comes in a variety of shapes and sizes. They are attached with a stitch through either 1, 2 or 4 holes, or a shank back. Metal buttons are classy, stylish, durable and often seen on denim jackets, jeans, and upscale blazers. Use them for functionality purposes or decoration.

Uses:

  • jeans
  • denim
  • jackets
  • blazers
  • coats

Pros:

  • durable
  • classy
  • novel

Metallic

An effect created by fibers made of metal, metal coated fibers, or fibers with a metal core used to make a fabric more lustrous. (see lurex)

Uses:

  • fabric
  • trimming

Pros:

  • high luster
  • flexible
  • dye resistant
  • chemical resistant

Cons:

  • poor strength
  • should be dry cleaned
  • electrical conductor
  • purely decorative

Microfiber

A fiber that is smaller in diameter than one denier, having a diameter of less than 10 micrometers, and are always made of synthetic fibers, like polyester, polyamide, and/or polypropelene.

Uses:

  • industrial uses
  • jackets
  • bottoms
  • dresses
  • skirts
  • accessories
  • upholstery

Pros:

  • durability
  • longevity
  • versatility
  • stain resistant
  • dries quickly

Cons:

  • flammable
  • shrinks easily
  • colors can fade quickly

Mikado

A luxurious form of silk, or polyester blend identified by its twill construction and satin finish. Consists of a heavier weight ideal for use in evening wear apparel.

Uses:

  • gowns
  • bridal apparel
  • costuming

Pros:

  • heavier weight
  • sturdy structure

Milliken Dyeing

A form of Digital printing on fabric to create a more detailed and sharp design.

Mineral Fibers

A fibrous material made from minerals such as glass, slag or molten rock and altered into a ceramic medium which is then used to create a non-flammable textile.

Uses:

  • insulation
  • hydroponics
  • soundproofing fireproofing

Pros:

  • non-flammable
  • lightweight
  • chemical resistance
  • tenacity

Cons:

  • coarse in large quantities
  • not especially abundant in fashion fabrics
  • allergic potential
  • poor abrasion resistance
  • poor elasticity
  • hydrophobic
  • heavyweight

Mink Fur

The pelt of a small animal with a thin body and incredibly soft fur, typically used in coating or accessories.

Uses:

  • high-end coats
  • accessories

Pros:

  • soft
  • warm
  • water proof

Cons:

  • ethically controversial

Modacrylic

Modified acrylic fibers made from acrylonitriles with larger amounts of other polymers making up the copolymers. The synthetic fiber is created and prized for the ease of which they can be dyed. Often used to create faux fur.

Uses:

  • faux fur
  • drapery
  • fleece

Pros:

  • easily dyed
  • low density
  • thermal retention
  • tenacity: stronger than wool
  • good dimensional stability
  • resistant to moths
  • thermoplasticity
  • hydrophobic
  • flame retardancy

Cons:

  • oleophilic
  • electrical retention
  • not resistant to extreme weather

Modal

A type of rayon manufactured from spinning reconstituted semi-synthetic cellulose fibers, in this case often from beech trees.

Uses:

  • loungewear
  • underwear
  • bathrobes

Pros:

  • good drape
  • hydrophilic
  • electrical conductivity
  • thermal conductivity
  • soft hand

Cons:

  • commonly causes allergic reactions
  • pilling
  • poor resiliency
  • dimensional stability
  • chemical reactivity
  • attracts mildew and mold

Mohair

A silk-like thread created from the fleece of an Angora goat, not to be confused with Angora Wool which comes from the Angora rabbit. The fiber is smooth, glossy, and wiry.

Uses:

  • suiting
  • coats
  • accessories
  • sweaters

Pros:

  • smooth
  • soft
  • reduced crimp
  • washable
  • resilient
  • dyes well
  • does not matte felt or pill

Moire

A textile or type of pattern with an appearance that can be described as watered, wet, wavy, or rippled created by a method called calendering. This “watered textile” characterized by its distinct pattern is created from threads imperfectly lined up between the two layers and typically is made on silk but can also be made of wool, cotton, or rayon . The pattern may resemble a woodgrain and is often glossy.

Uses:

  • trimming
  • formalwear

Pros:

  • luster
  • durability

Momme

A method of measuring the quality of silk by weight, similar to the thread count in other textiles. One momme is equal to 3.75 grams.

Monk's Cloth

A coarse and heavy fabric with a 4 x 4 basket weave originally made from worsted wool for monk's robes. Now can be made from Cotton , linen , silk, rayon, or synthetics.

Uses:

  • home decor
  • drapery
  • outerwear
  • sportswear

Pros:

  • common
  • easily attainable

Cons:

  • shrinks when washed
  • difficult to sew
  • threads tend to slide or fray
  • prone to snags
  • rough hand

Montagnac

A lustrous twill made from more luxurious fibers such as cashmere or camel hair.

Uses:

  • coating

Pros:

  • soft
  • warm
  • luxurious

Cons:

  • dry clean only

Moroccan

The intricate and highly technical print, pattern, or embroidery style characterized by its abstract or geometric patterns.

Moss Crepe

A higher grade dressmaking material, getting its name from the soft and moss-like appearance of the face side of the fabric. Its trademarked name is Sand Crepe (trademark). The moss effect is created by a plain weave or small dobby weave. Typically made a spun-rayon camel hair. and a filament rayon filling. The two-ply warp yarn is very coarse and bulkier than the fill yarn.

Uses:

  • dresses
  • gowns
  • robes

Pros:

  • textured
  • soft
  • drapeable

Cons:

  • prone to pulls and damage

Mother of Pearl Buttons

A closure (usually accompanied by a hole) that comes in a variety of shapes and sizes, and are made from Nacre, or mother of pearl, a smooth shining and iridescent layer on the inside of the shells of mollusks and prized for their incomparable elegance and, durability and sustainability. They are attached with a stitch through either 4, 2 or 1 hole, or a shank back. Use them for functionality purposes or decoration.

Uses:

  • closures
  • aesthetic

Pros:

  • far more durable than other options
  • incomparable elegance

Cons:

  • far more expensive than other closure options

Mousseline

An early form of Muslin made from silk, the fabric dates back to the 17th century. This sheer, lightweight fabric was used for a variety of clothing throughout the 17th century from Bengal (now Bangladesh) to the middle east, getting its name from the city of Mosul, where it was believed to have been first witnessed. It is somewhat like chiffon but with a crisp finish.

Uses:

  • evening wear
  • bridal wear
  • trimmings

Pros:

  • light
  • airy

Cons:

  • semi sheer
  • flammable when untreated
  • does not launder well
  • does not wear well

Muskrat

The pelt of a small animal related to the American beaver, used for its waterproof properties. Often dyed and used as an alternative to mink.

Uses:

  • coating
  • millinery
  • trims

Pros:

  • waterproof
  • warm
  • soft
  • cost effective

Cons:

  • not vegan
  • coarse hairs

Muslin

A type of plainly woven cotton fabric that evolved from Mousseline, originating in Bengal, it has been used for everything from clothing to bandages and more. Also primarily used in draping and for creating the first draft or sample garment when patternmaking. Usually in a beige or neutral coloration.

Uses:

  • tops
  • bottoms
  • dresses
  • test fittings

Pros:

  • variety of weights
  • simplistic
  • breathable

Cons:

  • flammable if untreated
  • not used for contemporary clothing