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Athugið, netverslunin er enn í vinnslu og á eftir að setja inn mikið af vörum.

Orð sem byrja á - V - (enska)

Vair

A form of fur fabric originating in the 14th century, created by sewing the backs and bellies of squirrels to one another in a checkered pattern. The pattern as a lining was mainly popular in the early 14th century, then later alternative styles gained popularity over it. The name is derived from the word variation or variegation and the colors varied from light gray, to nearly black, to gray with red streaks.

Uses:

  • cuff and collar linings
  • capes

Vat Dyeing

A method of dyeing that is particularly used on cellulosic fibers involving a water-insoluble dye. The dye is applied in a soluble form as to impregnate the fiber and then is oxidized to get it to return it to its original form. Gets its name from the vats that were originally used in the reduction of the indigo plants through fermentation.

Pros:

  • chlorine resistance
  • large variety of colors

Cons:

  • only possible with natural dyes
  • colors are difficult to reproduce being an agricultural product
  • may change color from exposure to light or abrasion

Vegetable Fiber

A form of natural fiber that is derived from plants. These fibers can be divided into three basic classifications; bast fibers including flax and hemp, leaf fibers such as manila and sisal, or seed fibers like cotton. Also see Cellulose Fibers.

Pros:

  • environmentally friendly
  • hydrophilic
  • anti-static
  • good thermal conductivity
  • high heat tolerance
  • easily laundered
  • resistant to alkali (bases)

Cons:

  • wrinkles
  • poor elasticity
  • shrinks easily
  • harmed by acids
  • attracts mildew when damp
  • flammable

Velour

A fabric resembling velvet or velveteen produced with a knit construction.

Uses:

  • athlesiure wear
  • gowns
  • tops
  • robes

Pros:

  • machine washable
  • has stretch

Cons:

  • prone to pilling and snagging
  • wears out fairly quickly
  • tends to absorb dust

Velvet

A fabric with a short, dense pile made with an extra warp yarn typically used in fashion and upholstery. Velvet can be made from a variety of materials including silk and polyester. The word velvet comes from the middle French word velu or "shaggy".

Uses:

  • gowns
  • robes
  • upholstery

Pros:

  • luxurious
  • soft

Cons:

  • dry-clean only
  • prone to tearing
  • prone to matting

Velvet Satin

A luxurious silk fabric with a short cut pile and a satin weave as the base. This fabric combines the richness of a satin with the soft hand of a velvet.

Uses:

  • dresses
  • skirts
  • gowns

Pros:

  • soft
  • luxurious

Cons:

  • not machine washable
  • prone to pilling

Velveteen

A fabric with a pile similar to velvet created with staple fibers rather than filament fibers, often produced with cotton. Velveteen is created by floating filings over 4 or 5 warp yarns on the typically plainly woven or twill fabric base.

Uses:

  • upholstery
  • coats
  • bedding

Pros:

  • more durable than velvet
  • affordable
  • machine washable

Cons:

  • less luster than regular velvet
  • not as soft as velvet
  • may shrink in the wash
  • prone to mildew
  • may stain faster than other fabrics

Venetian

A wool or worsted fabric made with a satin or twill weave that is sometimes napped. Getting its name from the city of Venice where it was created and textile weaving has been prevalent since the 9th century.

Uses:

  • coats
  • suits
  • skirts
  • dresses

Venise Lace

A type of needle lace, originally made in Italy in the 17th century, where a design is stitched onto dissolvable fabric which is later removed to reveal a raised embroidery pattern. Some of the earliest examples of Venise lace date back to the 16th century and depicted sharp acute angles and geometric patterns worked separately but later linked by a narrow band "footing". Also referred to as Guipure Lace or Point de Venise.

Uses:

  • trims
  • hat bands
  • dresses
  • skirts

Pros:

  • versatile
  • airy
  • adds depth to a piece

Cons:

  • fragile
  • transparent
  • typically expensive due to manufacturing costs

Vichy

A medium-weight, plainly woven fabric made from horizontal and vertical bands of dyed cotton or cotton blended yarns in variations of the same color. Although originally a striped fabric, modern day Vichy features a checkered pattern and is interchangeably referred to as gingham.

Uses:

  • draping
  • dresses
  • drapery
  • shirts

Pros:

  • strong
  • versatile
  • easy to clean

Cons:

  • may shrink if not preshrunk
  • prone to pilling
  • may be susceptible to mildew

Vicuna

A species of South American camelid, distantly related to the Alpaca, which produce a small amount of very fine wool every three years. Due to the rarity of the wool and the fact that Vicuna cannot be domesticated and must be wild-caught to be shorn, the price for this wool in incredibly high. Occasionally, Merino wool will be woven in such a way that the material resembles vicuna wool and is also sold as Vicuna wool. Although it no longer holds endangered species status, it is illegal to wear Vicuna wool in Peru unless you are Inca royalty.

Uses:

  • suits
  • sweaters
  • socks

Pros:

  • warm
  • machine washable
  • has stretch

Cons:

  • $1
  • 800-$3000 a yard for authentic vicuna
  • illegal to wear by Peruvian law
  • each vicuna only produces 1.1 lb of wool every 3 years

Vinyl

A plasticized version of PVC that is pliable enough to be added to a layer of fabric. This version of PVC was accidentally discovered in 1926 by Waldo L. Semon while he was trying to create a synthetic rubber. Originally, it was thought to be a way of adhering rubber to metal, but after additional testing, he realized he had created a highly versatile plasticized material that today we use in hundreds of ways.

Uses:

  • raincoats
  • tablecloths
  • upholstery

Pros:

  • weatherproof
  • durable
  • easy to clean
  • fade resistant
  • abrasion resistant

Cons:

  • not especially forgiving to mistakes
  • must be sewn with a walking foot
  • too thick for many sewing needles
  • feels like plastic
  • does not breathe well

Virgin Wool

The first coat of fleece produced from a lamb. This is the softest and finest coat it will produce in its lifetime. Although used less often in this context, this term can also refer to wool that has not been used, processed, or woven but does not need to come from that first shearing and can come from adult sheep.

Uses:

  • coats
  • suits
  • shirts

Pros:

  • strong
  • wrinkle-resistant
  • stain resistant
  • odor resistant

Cons:

  • limited wearability
  • prone to pilling
  • handwashing or dry cleaning only
  • can't be put in a dryer

Viscose

A type of manufactured cellulose fiber created by adding wood pulp to a viscous compound that dissolves the pulp, producing a soft fiber used in a variety of clothing articles. Also see Rayon.

Uses:

  • dresses
  • linings
  • shirts
  • shorts
  • coats
  • jackets

Pros:

  • drapability
  • hydrophilic
  • anti-static
  • conducts heat away from the body
  • soft
  • dyes easily
  • resistant to moths
  • biodegradable

Cons:

  • poor recovery or resiliency
  • poor dimensional stability
  • poor tenacity
  • poor elasticity
  • shrinks and loses strength in water
  • susceptible to mold and mildew

Vinyon

A synthetic fiber composed of PVC and used in a variety of applications from industrial filters to protective garments. The first commercial creation of vinyon fibers was in 1939, and they have been used ever since, despite the health risks of using chlorinated polymers. Nowadays, it is used as flame resistant fibers in clothing and in carpeting. Often times it is used as a way of bonding two fabrics together by adding heat to it, given that it softens at a fairly low temperature.

Uses:

  • carpeting
  • blankets
  • drapery
  • outdoor upholstery

Pros:

  • chemical resistant
  • bacteria resistant
  • insect resistant
  • strong adhesive qualities

Cons:

  • can degrade with light or heat into hazardous compounds
  • does not hold up well against abrasion

Viyella

A soft, flannel-like twill fabric made from a blend of lamb's wool and fine cotton. First created in England in 1893 and was the "first branded fabric in the world". Composed of 55% Merino wool and 45% cotton.

Uses:

  • sportswear
  • shirts
  • blouses
  • dresses
  • slips

Pros:

  • less prone to shrinkage than wool
  • machine washable
  • warm
  • soft
  • holds a pleat

Cons:

  • poor resistance to abrasion
  • poor resistance to creasing
  • not a widely used fabric anymore

Vlisco

A design created by a group of Dutch illustrators to pay tribute to the designs of ancient Indonesia. Traditionally dyed using the Batik method, the design is rigorously pressed into the fabric at high pressures so that even the smallest details may be printed.

Uses:

  • coats
  • suits
  • dresses
  • skirts

Pros:

  • very detailed printing process
  • good color quality

Voilé

A voilé refers to a plainly woven lightweight and gauzy material. Derived from the French word for "veil." Voilé is a semi-transparent dress material made of cotton, wool, or silk usually from cylindrical combed yarns. This type of material is known for its fluid and billowy drape. "Voilé de Laine" is the term for a wool voilé.

Uses:

  • home décor
  • drapery
  • dresses
  • skirts
  • lingerie
  • tops

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • breathable
  • soft
  • billowy drape

Cons:

  • fairly sheer
  • unpleasant to wear when wet
  • wrinkles easily
  • no stretch
  • burns quickly