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Orð sem byrja á - D - (enska)

Damask

The word damask refers to a type of weave that was originated during the Middle Ages. It is typically made with one or two colors with its pattern either matte with a shiny backdrop or vice versa. Now the word "damask" may be used in reference to the popular pattern that was historically woven into the fabric. They usually consist of flowers, fruit and ornate swirls that grow upward in an alternating gridded layout. They are woven with jacquard looms which gives the pattern high definition and detail. Damask fabrics are very durable, often reversible, and tend to shed dirt.

Uses:

  • upholstery
  • drapery

Pros:

  • durable
  • reversible
  • sheds dirt

Deer Hides

The hides of deer are both soft and supple making it great for a number of applications. It is stretchable and forms to the body easily. The hides are thin and breathable, yet still carry strength and durability. Deerskin is the thinnest of the hides resulting the most fashion-forward uses.

Uses:

  • jackets
  • shoes
  • handbags

Pros:

  • stretches
  • soft
  • supple
  • durable
  • thin

Degummed Silk

Degumming is a process that removes the silk gum (a protective layer) from silk to boost its shine, color, and overall hand. The process includes boiling the silk in hot water, and usually happens before the silk fiber is turned into yarn.

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • high luster

Denier

A unit of measurement that verifies a fiber's thickness. Microfibers are 1 denier or less, sheer fabrics tend to be 10 deniers or less, and opaque and sturdy fibers tend to be 40 deniers or higher.

Denim

A twill weave that most commonly features indigo warp yarn and white weft yarns giving the fabric a white back. America's use of denim dates back to the 1870's and were commonly used by miners and other laborers because of its strength and durability. The first pair of rivet-reinforced denim pants, or jeans, were made and distributed by Levi Strauss & Co. and later gained popularity quickly. From the Western movies of the early 1900's to the ripped up jeans of the 1970's punk era, they widely became a source of style in pop culture and remain a staple in designer collections. (See raw denim and selvedge denim)

Uses:

  • pants
  • jackets
  • skirts
  • shorts

Pros:

  • heavy
  • durable
  • resists snags and tears

Dimensional Stability

The ability for a fiber to stay its original size and shape through repeated use and care (in relation to shrinkage).

Dimity

Historically, this fabric was used in the 1800's for upholstery, curtains and even bustles. It is a thin, lightweight woven that is typically sheer in opacity with corded spaced stripes that could be single, double or triple grouping. It is mercerized and has a soft luster. When white, it resembles lawn.

Uses:

  • upholstery
  • curtains
  • bustles

Pros:

  • thin
  • lightweight
  • breathable
  • flexible drape

Cons:

  • sheer
  • prone to abrasion

Direct Print

Direct printing is a type of printing where dyes are applied directly to the fabric. Digital printing is a more common way of direct printing and has a more precise and detailed look. The fabric is fed through a series of rollers that hold a specific color and part of the full pattern to achieve the desired design.

Dobby Loom

The dobby loom dates back to 1843 and can achieve a number of weaves including one by the same name, twills , basketweaves, and piques. It is a floor loom that controls warp threads in order to create interesting woven designs. They can be manually run or run by a computer. This loom differs from a plain loom in that it may have up to thirty-two harnesses and a pattern chain, and it's expensive weaving.

Uses:

  • dobby
  • twill
  • basketweave
  • pique

Pros:

  • longer sequence of patterns

Dobby Weave

A dobby weave is made from a dobby loom which creates a geometric design within the woven adding a bit of texture to the textile.

Domett Flannel

Also spelled domet, domett flannel is a soft wool flannel, that was primarily used as army garb during the U.S. Civil War. It is now primarily used for reenactment costumes. It has a longer nap than on flannelette.

Uses:

  • costumes
  • shirts

Pros:

  • soft
  • breathable

Donegal Tweed

This tweed originated from County Donegal, Ireland. Historically, it was made of sheeps wool, and dyed with the blackberries, fuschia and moss that grow wildly there. What makes the tweed identifiable is the array of colored yarns that irregularly pop from the plain woven giving it a heathered look. The plain weave typically will have two different colors running through the warp and weft, however the heathered look may be seen in herringbones and check patterns as well. The yarns of this tweed are coarse with thick slubs and colored nubs.

Uses:

  • hats
  • suits
  • vests

Cons:

  • coarse

Dorlastan(e)

A brand of spandex. (see spandex, lyrcra)

Uses:

  • leggings
  • bodycon
  • athletic wear
  • bathing suits

Pros:

  • high elasticity

Cons:

  • wears over time
  • poor tenacity
  • poor abrasion resistance
  • heat sensitivity
  • bleach sensitivity

Dotted Swiss

A sheer, plainly woven cotton that features tiny swivel, lappet or flocked dots. The lappet is the most permanent. When hand woven with a swivel attachment, the dots are tied in by hand on the back of the cloth. The fabric was originated in Switzerland sometime in the 1750's. The ground fabric for a Swiss dot is usually a voile or a lawn.

Uses:

  • children's
  • bridal
  • dresses
  • skirts
  • blouses

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • thin
  • flexible drape
  • breathable

Cons:

  • prone to wear

Double Cloth

At least two warp yarns and three weft yarns come together to create a two-layered fabric that is connected by the third weft yarn. This type of weave can be used to create detailed patterns and designs throughout. Both faces of a double cloth fabric can typically be pulled easily to debulk the seams or hems of a garment.

Uses:

  • coats
  • jackets
  • home

Pros:

  • thick

Cons:

  • may separate at cut edge

Double Face

One warp yarn and two weft yarns create this type of double cloth that features two faces or "right" sides. Unlike a double cloth however, the two right sides of the fabric can not be separated.

Uses:

  • coats
  • jackets
  • dresses

Double Face Satin

A double face woven made with two warp yarns and one weft yarn that features a satin face on either side. It can present a different pattern on either side.

Uses:

  • ribbon
  • fashion applications

Double Knit

A fabric that consists of two knit faces made simultaneously and connected by interlocking loops.

Uses:

  • sweaters
  • cardigans
  • jacket
  • coats

Pros:

  • thick
  • reversible

Double Sided Tape

Comprised of a twill weave with a herringbone design that has the same face on either side. The flat tape may be used for everything from drawstrings to reinforced seams.

Uses:

  • drawstrings
  • reinforcement
  • straps
  • decorative embellishments

Drape

The fluidity of a fiber or fabric; directly correlates to a fiber's flexibility. The manner in which a fabric falls, or hangs.

Draping Tape

A thin tape used on dress forms to map out designs. It helps the designer to visualize panels, curve necklines, and gather the fabric to see how it will fall.

Drawcord

A woven cord that sometimes is finished with an aglet and is used to gather fabric together. They can be used in hoods, waistlines, shoes, and pouches.

Uses:

  • hoods
  • waistlines
  • shoes
  • pouches

Dress Forms

A model of a torso that gives designers a 3-dimensional look at the body. It is used for draping, sizing, adjustments, alterations, creating patterns and more. They come in various shapes and sizes, while an adjustable form can be used to tailor to a person's specific measurements. Dress forms can come with or without legs and arms.

Uses:

  • draping
  • pattern making
  • tailoring

Drill

This woven is comprised of a left-hand twill construction typically made of cotton or linen and has a strong bias weave. Drill fabrics are often made with coarse, medium-weight yarns. Known for its durability, it is commonly used in uniforms and carries a khaki color. The weave was worn in militaries throughout the world, including World War II, and later became a form of casual dress. Heavy weight drill is commonly used for chef's uniforms as well.

Uses:

  • uniforms
  • pants
  • work clothes
  • slip covers
  • sportswear

Pros:

  • durable
  • strong bias weave

Cons:

  • coarse

Duchesse Satin

A heavyweight satin that is typically used in evening wear. It has a high thread count and a medium body that gives it a luxurious feel. Its weight makes it the perfect platform for embroidery and beading making it a favorite for bridal designers. The material is strong, has a high luster, and it is firm. Characterized by grainy twill on the back.

Uses:

  • bridal
  • evening
  • cocktail

Pros:

  • lustrous
  • heavy weight
  • smooth hand
  • medium body

Duckbill Applique Scissors

A type of scissor that has a rounded blade used to cut appliques and embroideries without cutting the base. They cut closely to hems giving a clean look to the project at hand.

Dupione

Typically made of silk, dupioni is plainly woven and features a crisp hand. Fine warp threads weave through uneven weft threads giving it a slubbed texture. Threads that differ in color are sometimes woven through to give it an iridescent sheen. It is similar to a shantung, however it is thicker and heavier with more irregular slubs.

Uses:

  • evening
  • bridal

Pros:

  • lustrous
  • heavy weight
  • thick

Duvetyn(e)

This woven is a twill that carries a velvet or suede-like nap on one side. The close weave is brushed, singed, and sheared to conceal the weave. It is similar to wool broadcloth, but heavier and thicker. Opaque, it is widely used in the film industry to block out light or to create scenic backdrops. The name derived from the French word "duvet" meaning "down".

Uses:

  • curtains
  • backdrops

Pros:

  • opaque
  • soft

Dyeing

The process of adding color to yarns, fabric (piece dyeing) or garments. This process may date back to 34,000 B.C. where ochre, plants, barks, and insects were used to add color to yarns or fabric. Both natural and synthetic dyes are used today in production. Methods of dyeing vary and have become more complex over the years through the use of technology. (see batik dyeing, cationic dyeing, continuous dyeing, cross dyeing, garment dyeing, jet dyeing, milliken dyeing, solution dyeing, tie-dyeing, vat dyeing, yarn dyeing)